Most Appropriate Business Letter Writing Etiquette

Appropriate Business Letters Writing Etiquette, Rules
Business Letters Writing Etiquette

Business letters are important. They convey business communication where the tone is normally kept formal. As a business professional you require a very good understanding of the kind of relationship you hold with your colleagues, clients, vendors or suppliers. However, with the influx of the new media where email and instant messaging are on hot platter, executives in many organizations still prefer to good the old style with business letters.

The Right Business Writing Perspective

Whenever you consider writing a business letter, make sure to keep the goals, situations, expectations and objective of the reader in mind. This is important because different letters are linked to different emotions and even the level of intimacy is different from one another. Organize your thoughts and include their expectations and try to get the most out of the communication so that you may use it to your advantage. No matter what the message it contains, try to make it as positive as possible. Avoid negatives such as not, refuse, unfortunately and failure as much as you can. The letter should carry information in a positive perspective.

Basic Business Letter Writing Etiquette and Rules

Here are a few of the basic business letter writing etiquette you should follow to get your deals done in the most professional manner.

1. What happens in business letter is information and ideas are shared, offers are made and accepted, new people are introduced, apologizes are made and recommendations are served. They normally rotate between company owners, executives, consumers, job seekers, employees and community members.

2. Business letters normally come under three formats: block, modified block and semi-block. Block letters are left justified and single-spaced; modified-block letter’s sender’s and recipient’s addresses are left-justified, single-spaced and the date center aligned; semi-blocks are indented, not left justified.

3. Almost every business letter starts with the date on top followed by both the sender and recipient’s mailing addresses. With the introductory salutation greet the recipient and carry on with the body where the main purpose of the letter is explained on a positive note. These letters normally end with ‘Thanks’ or ‘Sincerely’ with your name and job profile beneath it.

4. Explain the purpose of your letter in the opening letter itself. Avoid jargon or highly technical language. Make it precise and to the point. Do not beat round the bush. The objective should be to make even the secretary or assistant understand the significance of the letter without technical grounds.

5. The first paragraph should be detail specific. Your recipient must be able to fully understand the reason behind the letter received. Write it in a highly professional tone and focus more on the positives. For example, focus more on what the company can do rather than what it can’t.

6. Close your letter by asking the recipient to take action. Ask them to get in touch. Provide them with your contact address or number in which you will be available. If you have shared your email, proofread it, in case you have made in mistake. Addresses are case sensitive.

7. Business letters are normally written to potential employers, clients or business associates. It should hence be understandable, clear and to the point. Check for grammar mistakes and typographical errors. Spell the recipient’s name correctly and double-check his/her mailing address. And most importantly, proof read, before sending it out.

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